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参考答案:
SECTION 1:LISTENING TEST
Part A: Spot Dictation
1. government success 2. talk about
3. press conferences 4. alert foreign correspondents
5. local officials 6. write their stories
7. eye witness 8. opposition politicians
9. check information 10. close to it
11. inform other people 12. in an interesting way
13. only one chance 14. element of repetition
15. at the start of a report 16. shorten
17. match the subject matter 18. royal wedding
19. plane crash 20. making it difficult to understand
Part B: Listening Comprehension
1-5 D B D C B 6-10 C A D A D
11-15 B A C A B 16-20 D A C B B
SECTION 2: READING TEST
1-5 A B A B C 6-10 B C C D B
11-15 C D C D B 16-20 C B D C B
SECTION 3: TRANSLATION TEST
自达尔文以来,生物学家们一直坚信,大自然的运作是没有计划的或者是没有意义的,
它不会通过直接的设计途径去追求目标。但是,今天我们知道,这一信念是个严重错误。
为什么恰如达尔文所理解和描述的进化就该是无计划、无理性的呢?当飞机设计工程师们
利用风洞对大量的、根据统计数据制造的机体模型的耐用性能进行检试,以从中选出功能
最佳的设计时,物理学家经过上万次的计算机运算,试图找出是哪些材料、以怎样的结合
方式、以及什么的结构形式才最适宜用于原子核反应堆的建造时,我们能够说这中间没有
自然选择的过程么?他们也未进行事先设计的适应性调节,而是根据选择原理开展工作
的。但是人们从未认为这种方法是无计划、无理性的。
SECTION 4:LISTENING TEST
Part A:Note taking and Gap filling
1. labor saving 2. vacuum
3. electrical 4. dishwasher
5. time-consuming 6. models/types/kinds
7. twelve 8. water
9. cutlery 10. detergent
11. turn/switch 12. saucepans/pans
13. solid 14. dries
15. medium-sized 16. once
17. enough 18. meals
19. noisy 20. last
Part B:Listening and Translation
Ⅰ. Sentence Translation
(1)这是本世纪内袭击该地区的最严重的飓风,但是至今未收到有关破坏或伤亡的报告。
(2)我刚收到香港办事处迈克尔的电话,他需要最新的销售数字,你能否明天上午一上
班就把数字传真给他?
(3)如果你能在周末以前约个时间来见我们,我们将能告诉你我们的决定。
(4)在今年剩下的这段时间里,美国经济将有稳定的发展,失业率下降,通货膨胀得到
控制。
(5)总统说政府正在鼓励大企业在该国、特别是在东南沿海地区投资。
Ⅱ. Passage Translation
(1)伦敦的旅游季节过去主要是夏季数月,现在已全年如此。每年约有1500万人来英国,
其中大部分游客在伦敦至少要住几天。但伦敦不仅所旅游城市,它是行政中心,女王
的住地。它还是英国的金融中心。
(2)加拿大幅员辽阔,其面积仅次于俄罗斯。可是它只有2600万人口,是联合王国人口
的一半还不到。国土的三分之一覆盖着森林,还有大片的草原,无数的湖泊和河流。
其气候差异甚大。除了温哥华以外,冬天异常寒冷。温哥华由于地处西海岸,气候较
温和。加拿大的夏天总的来说天气暖和,特别是内陆地区,因此你只需要轻薄的衣服。
SECTION 5:READING TEST
1. Because the chatline company provides sex lines to British callers and it breaks industry
rules of advertisement.
2. The company offers sex line to callers from Britain without using the British 0898 numbers.
The callers have to ring phone numbers in the Virgin Isles first and then they are given
Guyanan numbers for the chatline service, thus the company earns more money in the
process. The company didn’t give the countries of origin in their advertisement.
3. Because the routing between Britain and Guyana is relatively simple and direct, BT could
not isolate the 52 numbers involved. The High Court also prevents BT from taking such
action until a full hearing is heard from both sides.
4. Tanning in the sun may cause skin cancer while a tanning salon may be awfully expensive.
5. The hormone may also prevent aging of skin. In addition, it might hep to cure vitligo, a
disease that causes a progressive depigmentation of the skin.
6. After application (taken orally or applied topically), the hormone (Melano-Tan) would enter
the bloodstream and systematically tan the entire body; Initial tanning would begin in two or
three days and a dark, uniform tan could be achieved within two weeks.
7. Professor Ordman found that taking vitamin C twice a day (one 500mg dose every 12 hours)
can keep blood levels of the vitamin continuously high. He was not definte/certain about
vitamin C’s anti-oxidant properties.
8. Because Pauling’s book on vitamin C popularized the idea of taking large doses of vitamin
C. He is also known for taking huge doses/megadoses of vitamin C every day.
9. The sentence can be paraphrased as;However, most of the vitamin taken becomes/is
useless//has no effects//brings no obvious effects.
10. Megadoses of vitamin C have some protective effect against the common cold. However
there is no evidence of a beneficial effect against other diseases (such as heart disease,
cancer and ageing process.)
SECTION 6:TRANSLATION TEST
In October 1995, another bridge flew to span the Huangpu River, connecting Punan with
Fengxian. This Fengpu Bridge is the fourth Huangpu River bridge completed and open to traffic
after the Xupu, Nanpu and Yangpu bridges.
The Fengpu Bridge is the first bridge across the Huangpu River built with funds totaling
446 million yuan jointly raised by the departments concerned and enterprises of Fengxian
County and urban districts of the City. It was successfully completed in one year and 7 months
only. The completion of the bridge has solved the problem of crossing the Huangpu River that
bothered the residents in Fengxian and Punan for a long time. It has also improved the
investment environment in the area and laid a good foundation for the development and
construction on the north bank of the Hangzhou Bay.
In the golden autumn of October, the Xupu, Nanpu, Yangpu and Fengpu Bridges on the
Huangpu River, bathed in the golden sunshine, show their distinctive features and enhance each
other’s magnificence, adding more luster to Shanghai, a cosmopolis that is full off charm and
vitality. In the near future, Shanghai is going to build more facilities across the river to link both
banks of the Huangpu River closer.
听力测试题录音文字稿:
SECTION 1:LISTENING TEST
Part A:Spot Dictation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear a passage and read the same passage with
blanks in it. Fill in each of the blanks with the word or words you have heard on the tape. Write
your answer in the corresponding space in your answer booklet. Remember you will hear the
passage only once. Now let’s begin Part A with Spot Dictation.
News can be something the authorities want you to know, or something they would rather
keep secret. An announcement of a government success, a denial of a ailure, or, a secret scandal
that nobody really wants you to talk about.
If the authorities want to tell the world some good news, they issue statements,
communiqués, and call press conferences. Or politicians make speeches. Local newspapers,
radio and television help to alert foreign correspondents to what is going on. And by making
contacts with local officials, journalists can ask for more information or explanation to help them
write their stories.
Unless the correspondent is an eye-witness, it’s rare to trust any single source. Officials
have a policy to defend, and opposition politicians want to attack it. Rumor and gossip can also
confuse the situation. So, you have to check information as much as possible using common
sense and experience as final checks to help establish just what’s likely to be the truth, or close
to it.
Just getting the news is only half the job. A correspondent may be well-informed, but his
job is to inform other people, the public. So once the information is available it has to be written
in an interesting way which is also easily understood. Particularly for radio, since, while a
newspaper reader can turn back and re-read a sentence or two, the radio listener has only one
chance. This also means that only a limited number of facts can be contained in a sentence, that
there should be an element of repetition. And vital information necessary to understand the latest
development should be presented at the start of a report-in case the producer of a news program
decides to shorten an item, by cutting for example the last sentence or two.
Finally, the style of presentation must match the subject matter. A cheerful voice might be
perfect for a royal wedding. But it would be sadly out of place for a report of a plane crash. And
this would also confuse and distract the listener, probably making it difficult to understand just
what had happened and to whom.
Part B:Listening Comprehension
Directions: In this part of the test, there will be some short talks and conversations. After each
one, you will be asked some questions. The talks, conversations and questions will be spoken
only once. Now listen carefully and choose the right answer to each question you have heard and
write the letter of the answer you have chosen in the corresponding space in your answer booklet.
Now let’s begin Part B with Listening Comprehension.
Questions 1~5 are based on the following conversation.
FRED: Well, Vic, I’m sure all our listeners would love to be brought up to date on the latest in
tiny television.
VIC: It’s an expanding market, Fred, that’s for sure, and they seem to be getting smaller
every year.
FRED: Which countries are dominating the market?
VIC: At the moment it’s Japan, principally. In the spring of 1982 Sony introduced the
passage only once. Now let’s begin Part A with Spot Dictation.
News can be something the authorities want you to know, or something they would rather
keep secret. An announcement of a government success, a denial of a ailure, or, a secret scandal
that nobody really wants you to talk about.
If the authorities want to tell the world some good news, they issue statements,
communiqués, and call press conferences. Or politicians make speeches. Local newspapers,
radio and television help to alert foreign correspondents to what is going on. And by making
contacts with local officials, journalists can ask for more information or explanation to help them
write their stories.
Unless the correspondent is an eye-witness, it’s rare to trust any single source. Officials
have a policy to defend, and opposition politicians want to attack it. Rumor and gossip can also
confuse the situation. So, you have to check information as much as possible using common
sense and experience as final checks to help establish just what’s likely to be the truth, or close
to it.
Just getting the news is only half the job. A correspondent may be well-informed, but his
job is to inform other people, the public. So once the information is available it has to be written
in an interesting way which is also easily understood. Particularly for radio, since, while a
newspaper reader can turn back and re-read a sentence or two, the radio listener has only one
chance. This also means that only a limited number of facts can be contained in a sentence, that
there should be an element of repetition. And vital information necessary to understand the latest
development should be presented at the start of a report-in case the producer of a news program
decides to shorten an item, by cutting for example the last sentence or two.
Finally, the style of presentation must match the subject matter. A cheerful voice might be
perfect for a royal wedding. But it would be sadly out of place for a report of a plane crash. And
this would also confuse and distract the listener, probably making it difficult to understand just
what had happened and to whom.
Part B:Listening Comprehension
Directions: In this part of the test, there will be some short talks and conversations. After each
one, you will be asked some questions. The talks, conversations and questions will be spoken
only once. Now listen carefully and choose the right answer to each question you have heard and
write the letter of the answer you have chosen in the corresponding space in your answer booklet.
Now let’s begin Part B with Listening Comprehension.
Questions 1~5 are based on the following conversation.
FRED: Well, Vic, I’m sure all our listeners would love to be brought up to date on the latest in
tiny television.
VIC: It’s an expanding market, Fred, that’s for sure, and they seem to be getting smaller
every year.
FRED: Which countries are dominating the market?
VIC: At the moment it’s Japan, principally. In the spring of 1982 Sony introduced the
VIC: Yes, Casio—that’s C—A—S—I—O. Their latest is a calculator-sized TV about
one-third the bulk of the Watchman and with 1983 production figures of 2000 units a
month.
FRED: I see.
VIC: And, according to a spokesman, they hope to match their calculator sales, which are
about 25 million units per year.
FRED: Very impressive. And no doubt other Japanese companies will jump on the
bandwagon.
VIC: Most likely.
FRED: Now, could you tell us about other countries making these tiny TVs?
VIC: Of course. From Sinclair in England there’s one similar in size to the Casio, and their
production levels were 1 million for 1983.
FRED: Obviously they’re planning on backing a winner!
VIC: How right you are. A representative said they expect a mass-market response, not just
as a novelty item.
FRED: And just which market are the manufacturers aiming at?
VIC: Mainly the commuters who spend hours going to and from work. These tiny TVs will
provide relief from the monotonous train and bus rides.
FRED: Well, Vic, thanks for keeping us in touch with this extremely popular gadget.
VIC: My pleasure, and happy viewing to all of you with those wee TVs.
Question No.1. What is being discussed in the talk?
Question No.2. When was this product recommended to the public?
Question No.3. Which of the following companies first introduced this product?
Question No.4. Which group of people are most likely to form the main market for this
product?
Question No.5. According to the talk, which of the following is true about its market?
Questions 6~10 are based on the following conversation.
Male: How many different countries do you think you’ve been to?
Female: Once I made a count of how many countries I’d hitchhiked through and it came to
twenty eight. So if you add on a few more for those where I haven’t hitched, I imagine
it comes to about forty by now.
Male: About forty! And are there any of these that you feel you really would like to go back
to?
Female: Two that I could actually live in I think. One would be the west coast of Canada
because I think that had everything to offer. It was rich culturally, it was very bright, it
had a very pleasant climate, slightly improved on Britain. It had the Rocky Mountains
behind, loads of coastline, um, a lot going on both day and night, a large university,
and it was just near America if you felt like crossing the border. The other place I liked,
but more for a holiday, was Sardinia, which I found was one of the quietest, most
unspoilt parts of Europe that I’ve seen.
Male: What is it about traveling that makes you want to keep doing it?
Female: I think it’s the one time when I feel completely alive every minute of the day. I also
feel I have a tremendous amount of experience to bring back every time I’ve traveled,
there’s so much to share with other people. I feel I’ve got, sort of, two hundred per
cent of me to give once I come back. But when I’m actually doing it, you’re free from
all the bounds of routine, you’re free from the assumptions people make about you.
You’re free from the inhibitons that cause you not to fully be yourself and enjoy
yourself because of what people might think and so on.
Male: But it can also be a little bit dangerous at times too, can’t it?
Female: It can certainly be dangerous if you’re doing it alone. I avoid traveling alone whenever
I can. I mostly go with people I know very well and this is part of the traveler
discovering the person you’re traveling with and discovering the differences in taste
and the similarities in taste. But, um the most dangerous situation I found myself in
was nearly being knifed here in Devon, in Tlfracombe. But apart from that, I was on a
train in Hungary where there was a murder in the loo, and we were kept for 10 hours
while they investigated why somebody had been stabbed in the loo. I’ve also slept,
voluntarily, in a prison in Norway and another prison in Germany. Um and in one of
them we were locked in and heard the other prisoners shouting and banging on the
doors and that felt quite frightening. Um I managed to get right into the center of the
Middle East war through no choice of my own. They wouldn’t let us out of the plane
and we were caught throughout the whole war in the country and couldn’t get around
at all. That felt as if you were living on a knife edge; we were lying there
contemplating quite coolly whether, if you were living on a knife edge; we were lying
there contemplating quite coolly whether, if there was an air raid, we should actually
go into the shelter or allow ourselves to be killed on the spot. And, er there are
certainly risks and I think more so when you do travel alone, so I try and avoid it.
Question No.6. How many countries has the woman been to?
Question No.7. Which place does the woman seem to like most?
Question No.8. Considering that traveling can be dangerous at times, what does the woman
do?
Question No.9. Which of the following is true about the woman?
Question No.10. Why does the woman want to keep traveling?
Questions 11~15 are based on the following news.
Here is a summary of the news.
“No general election yet” says the Prime Minister.
Five people die in an earthquake in central Italy.
And one-fourth million pounds is stolen from a security van.
And one-fourth million pounds is stolen from a security van.
In a speech in the city of London last night, the Prime Minister announced that there will be
no general election in the near future. Talk of a quick elction was pure speculation, she said. A
general election would be held when it was in the best interests of the nation to do so.
In central Italy, several small towns and villages are still cut off by avalanches following the
earthquake during the night which killed five people. It was central Italy’s strongest earthquake
for several years and hundreds of people have been made homeless. In Rome, as well as in
Florence, Naples and Perugia, gas pipes were broken, windows shattered and electric cables
thrown onto the streets.
Thieves got away with almost one-fourth million pounds after security van was ambushed
in central London early this morning. The security van was rammed by a lorry as it was taking a
short cut through a narrow street off Piccadilly. Three masked men then threatened the driver
and his assistant with shotguns and forced one of them to unlock the van. The thieves made their
escape in a car parked nearby. This car was later found abandoned in south London. The driver
of the van and his assistant were badly shaken but not seriously hurt.
Hospital waiting lists in the southwest of England have gone up by a quarter in the last five
years. While the number of doctors, nurses and other staff have increased, the demand on the
service has grown even faster.
Question No.11. What does the Prime Minister say about the general election?
Question No.12. What happened in central Italy?
Question No.13. Where did the raid on a security van take place?
Question No.14. About how much money was stolen from the security van?
Question No.15. Which of the following statements is true about the hospitals in
south-western England
Questions 16~20 are based on the following talk.
The figures for burglaries have risen alarmingly over the last few years and are now quite
appalling. Let me quote you a few statistics about break-ins.
A house is burgled in Britain now about every two minutes, and over the past three years
the number of burglaries reported to the police has risen by approximately 50,000 to well over
400,000 this year. The insurance companies report that last year alone household burglary losses
rose by 27 per cent over the previous year to 138.2 million, and several companies are refusing
to provide burglary cover in what we might call high-risk areas.
There are, nevertheless, half a dozen measures which can be taken against burglaries, which
I will briefly outline for you. It really only requires some basic common sense and a small outlay,
combined with a little knowledge of the way a burglar thinks and operates. You have to put
yourself in his position, really. Most burglars are opportunists looking for an easy break-in, so
don’t make things simple for them. Don’t advertise the fact you’re out or away, or be careless
about security. Even if you’re just popping out for a quarter of an hour, don’t leave doors and
windows open or unlocked. A burglary can take less than ten minutes.
This time element leads me to my second main point, that where a house is hard to get into
and will take a long time to do so because you’ve fitted good locks and bolts on your exterior
doors and windows or even burglar alarms, the chances are that the burglar will move on to
somewhere easier. There are plenty of these, I can assure you. Milk bottles left on the doorstep,
papers by the front door, garage doors wide open, curtains drawn in the daytime or undrawn at
night are all indications. For comparatively little you can buy a programmed time-switch that’ll
turn on and off a light at appropriate times.
Not all burglaries happen while you are out, of course. You should always be wary of
callers at the door who say, for example, that they’ve come to read the gas meter; always check
their credentials, and if in doubt don’t let them in. It’s also a good idea to keep a record of serial
numbers on electrical equipment, radios, TVs and so on, or even to take photographs of valuable
jewelry, antiques or pictures.
Question No.16. How many burglaries have been reported this year?
Question No.17. How does the insurance industry react to the rise of burglaries?
Question No.18. Which does the insurance industry react to the rise of burglaries?
Question No.19. Which of the following statements is true, according to the passage?
Question No.20. What might be the best title for this passage?
SECTION 4: LISTENING TEST
Part A: Note-taking and Gap-filling
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear a short talk. You will hear the talk only once.
While listening to the talk, you may take notes on the important points so that you can have
enough information to complete a gap-filling task on a separate answer booklet. You are required
to write ONE word or figure only in each blank. You will not get your answer booklet until after
you have listened to the talk. Now listen to the talk carefully.
Over the last fifty years housework has been made considerably easier by the invention of
an increasing number of labor-saving devices and appliances, mostly electrical, which have
drastically cut down the amount of time and effort previously needed to do the everyday
household chores. For many years now there have been vacuum cleaners, electric irons, washing
machines and floor-polishers; now we have electric potato-peelers and even electric carving
knives. We can buy cookers that will switch themselves on and produce a meal that is ready to
eat the minute we get back home. If we have one of those electric pop-up toasters, we can make
toast at the breakfast table itself. Mashed potatoes can be quickly and effortlesslymade with a
mixer, which usually has a variety of attachments that enable you to make all sorts of other more
exotic things like fresh orange juice or real mayonnaise. And a tumble-drier can save you from
the frustration of hanging out the washing only to have to bring it in again ten minutes later
when a menacing storm-cloud looms over.
Probably the most important piece of electrical equipment to become widely used in the last
twenty years is the dishwasher. Washing up by hand is not only a time-consuming task (it can
take longer than eating the meal itself), but also an extremely boring one, particularly when you
are on your own, and it also ruins your hands. Dishwashers come in a range of different sizes
and models to suit your purse, the size of your family, and the layout of your kitchen. They can
be stood up on the floor or on a worktop, or they can be mounted on a wall. And their capacity
ranges from six to twelve place-settings. If you buy one, it is worth having it plumbed into the
mains water supply to save you from having to connect rubber pipes to your taps each time you
use it. All you have to do is load the dirty dishes, glasses and cutlery into the racks inside the
machine, pour in some special detergent powder, close the door and switch it on; it does the rest
by itself while you get on and do more interesting things. Of course, most dishwashers can’t
accommodate large saucepan and frying pans, and you do have to scrape all scraps of solid food
from the dishes before you put them in to avoid blocking the filters, but the machine will wash
almost everything else and get rid of even the most stubborn egg and listick stains. When the
washing cycle is over, the machine dries the plates and glasses with its own heat, and indeed
they can be left inside until they are needed for the next meal.
If you buy a medium-sized dishwasher, you probably won’t need to wash up more than
once a day. The drawback of this, of course, is that you have to have enough dishes, cutlery, etc.
to last three or four meals. So it can happen that people who buy a dishwasher have to buy new
china and glasses, either because they haven’t got enough or because the ones they’ve got don’t
fit the machine. This extra expense may not only be necessary, but also desirable, for one has to
remember that dishwashers can be aute noisy. This means that many people prefer only to use
their machine once a day, preferably last thing at night, when you can just shut the kitchen door
on it and go to bed.
Part B: Listening and Translation
Ⅰ. Sentence Translation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 5 English sentences. You will hear the sentences
only once. After you have heard each sentence, translate it into Chinese and write your version in
the corresponding space in your answer booklet. Now let’s begin Part b with Sentence
Translation.
Sentence No.1. This is the most serious hurricane to have hit the region this century, but so
far there have been no reports of damage or injuries.
Sentence No.2. I’ve just got a call from Michael in the Hong-Kong office and he needs the
latest sales figures, so could you fax them to him first thing tomorrow
morning?
Sentence No.3. If you make an appointment and see us towards the end of the week, we’ll be
able to let you know our decision.
Sentence No.4. The U S economy is going to enjoy steady growth for the remainder of the
year with unemployment rate lowered and inflation kept under control.
Sentence No.5. The president said that his government is encouraging its big enterprises to
invest in this country, especially in the south-eastern coastal area.
Ⅱ. Passage Translation
Directions: In this part of the test, you will hear 2 English passages. You will hear the passage
only once. After you have heard each passage, translate it into Chinese and write your version in
the corresponding space in your answer booklet. You may take notes while you are listening.
Now let’s begin Passage Translation with the first passage.
Passage 1:
The tourist season in London, which used to be mainly in the summer months, is now all
the year round. Around 15 million people visit Britain each year, and most of these visitors
spend at least a few days in London.
But London is more than this. It is the center of government and the home of the Queen. It
is also the financial center of Britain.
Passage 2:
Canada is huge country, second in size only to Russia. Yet it has only 26 million people,
which is less than half the population of the United Kingdom.
A third of the country is covered by forest and there are also vast grasslands and countless
lakes and rivers.
There are great variations in climate. Winters are extremely cold except in Vancouver,
which has a milder climate owing to its location on the west coast. Canadian summers are warm
on the whole, especially inland, so you’ll only need lightweight clothing.